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Times Tables Games To Play At KS1 & KS2: Free & Fun Ways To Learn Tables Fast

Times tables games are one of the best ways to help children learn their multiplication tables. So here, for all parents and teachers looking for ideas to inject more enthusiasm into learning times tables, are our 35 favourite times tables games, organised by year group and times table.

These times tables activities have been deliberately selected for their ease of use: most don’t need any additional resources at all; some require just a pen and paper, or a pack of cards, or some board game counters.

All of these times tables games are suitable for use in primary school and most are also easily adaptable to do at home at the kitchen table or even out on a walk. We’ve been sure to include a few active maths times tables games too to get children running around as they learn.

Looking for some fun games to boost pupils’ learning? Here are our top favourite 25 maths games you can do at home as well as games for different ages collected here:
KS1 maths games
KS2 maths games
KS3 maths games

Teaching and learning times tables

As most teachers or parents will know it’s not an easy task teaching times tables but spare a thought for children, many of whom struggle to learn their times tables. They will get there but it takes time.

Times table or multiplication games are a fun way to inject enthusiasm into the learning process and support everyone to keep working at it.

Like all maths games they work best in the context of a strong whole school approach to teaching times tables from Year 1 (and sometimes earlier). We’ve got lots of sound advice on how and why children need to learn times tables on this blog so read these first before you move on to times tables games.

And of course, the multiplication tables check is now compulsory in Year 4 so that adds an additional impetus on schools and families to support children to master their tables.

About these times tables games

All these times tables games are adapted from our premium resource The Ultimate Times Tables Resource Pack. This is available as part of a subscription to our Maths Hub and includes a range of times tables tests, times tables worksheets, and lots more other times tables activities and guidance to support a really secure depth of knowledge of times tables.

We’ve suggested the times table for each game but most of these games can be adapted for times tables fun on whichever times table you need to practise.

A few of the games we’ve selected need some printed material. This is all included as part of the Ultimate Times Tables Resource Pack; we’ve also included a small download of the essential ones here, so look out for the free Times Tables Games Printable Resources.

Best Times Tables Games KS1

Year 1 Times Tables Games

In Year 1, times tables are introduced using the terms ‘lots of’ and ‘groups of’ only – there is no use of the multiplication symbol or writing formal multiplication sentences. Counting up and down in 2s, 5s and 10s starts.

2 Times Table Games for Year 1

2 Times Tables Up The Stairs

Using cubes, can you make a staircase using multiples of 2?

What you need: Interconnecting cubes e.g. Numicon, parents may find it easier to use Lego ‘2 bits’.

How to play:

  • Step 1: Explain to children that they will be building a staircase out of cubes, using their knowledge of multiples of 2 to help. If needed, discuss features of a staircase and what their staircase may look like.
  • Step 2: Provide children with interconnecting cubes. Together, create the first three stairs of the staircase, saying the multiples of 2 (e.g. 2, 4, 6) as you build.
  • Step 3: Invite children to continue building their staircases, and each time they add a new stair, to say which multiple of 2 they have ‘built’.

Suitable for: home, school

5 Times Table Games for Year 1

Make The Fives

Can you make numbers from groups of five objects?

What you need: cubes/counters/beads or similar object.

How to play:

  • Step 1: Before starting the activity arrange for each child to have access to a large number of items, such as cubes or counters or beads.
  • Step 2: Call out a multiple of 5 (e.g. 30).
  • Step 3: Explain that the children’s challenge is to work alone or in pairs to race to make groups of five out of the objects they have been given until they have the number that you have called (e.g. for 30, they would need to make six groups of 5 out of their objects).
  • Step 4: Once children have finished making the number called out of groups of five, count in 5s to the number, and identify how many groups of 5 are needed to make that number.
  • Step 5: Repeat with other multiples of 5.

Suitable for: home, school.

Suitable for: school (could be adapted for home)

10 Times Table Games for Year 1

Mean 90 Game

Watch out for ‘mean 90’ in this counting game!

What you need: Mini whiteboards and pens for each child playing. You can use ordinary paper instead of whiteboards.

How to play:

  • Step 1: Arrange children so that they are sitting in a circle and each has a mini whiteboard or piece of paper and pen at their feet. Ensuring that the adult leading the game is part of the circle.
  • Step 2: The adult starts by saying ‘0’.
  • Step 3: The next child (in the direction chosen by the adult) says the next
    multiple of 10 (i.e. 10).
  • Step 4: Children continue passing the ‘count’ around the circle. If a child has to say ‘90’ then they have ‘Mean 90’ and they must sit down.
  • Step 5: The count then continues, until it reaches 100. Then it starts again
    from 0. Each time a player has to say ‘90’ they sit down.
  • Step 6: Players who are sat down have to then predict (using their
    reasoning skills) on their mini whiteboard who will be the next
    player to be ‘out’. Two children ‘win’ the game, the last child standing, and the child who has achieved the most ‘predictions’ correctly.

Suitable for: school.

Speedy Tens

Who can win the most cards in this game?

What you need: Medium digit cards 0-10 (create yourself or see download).

How to play:

  • Step 1: Before launching the activity, place children in pairs, and give each pair a set of digit cards from 1-9. You can make these yourself by writing out on separate pieces of paper or card the digits from 1 to 9 or use the large digit cards provided in the resource sheets. You can do this activity at home with just yourself and your child.
  • Step 2: Children take it in turns to turn over a digit card. They then have to say how ‘many’ there are in that number groups of 10. For example, if they turned over 5, they would need to say 50.
  • Step 3: Children can count out loud, or in their heads. The first child to say the correct answer ‘wins’ the card.
  • Step 4: Children then repeat, turning over another card.The player with the highest number of cards at the end wins.

Suitable for: home, school.

Times Tables Printable Resource Pack

Free printable versions of any resources required to complete the times tables games including the Find the cheese board game

Year 2 Times Tables Games

2 Times Table Games for Year 2

Multiples of 2 Flashcards

Can you join the two’s band? We are going to create a band that plays their instruments based on the multiples of 2 they say.

What you need: Musical instrument per child, Multiples of 2 flashcards (create yourself or see download).

How to play:

  • Step 1: Every child playing requires an instrument or a toy to bang.
  • Step 2: Either use the flashcards provided in the resource or write out on small pieces of paper all the multiples of 2 up to 20: 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20.
  • Step 3: Distribute 1 or more of these cards to each child (or adult) playing. As a group, the aim is to make a noise when your multiple comes around.
  • Step 4: Start counting through the multiples of 2. How quickly can you go?

Suitable for: home, school

Two for Tennis?

Can you play tennis by counting forwards and backwards in 2s?

What you need: Nothing

How to play:

  • Step 1: Arrange children into pairs, and ask children to imagine they are playing a game of tennis, but instead of passing a ball between each other, they are passing multiples of 5.
  • Step 2: Challenge children to count in multiples of 2, starting with 0.
  • Step 3: Each child in the pair takes it in turns to say a multiple of 2, and the
    other child says the next multiple of 2, and so on. When they reach
    24, they then return back to 0 in reverse.
  • Step 4: If a child takes more than three seconds to say the next multiple of
    2, or if they make a mistake, they have ‘dropped the ball’ and are
    out.
  • Step 5: The child who says 0 for the second time scores the ‘match point’
    and wins.
  • Step 6: Repeat, changing the ‘match point’ number to another multiple of
    2 if you wish.

Suitable for: home, school

5 Times Table Games for Year 2

5s Blast Off!

Can you count in 5s to 50 without speaking at the same time?

What you need: Nothing.

How to play:

  • Step 1: Before launching the activity, arrange the children into small groups, groups of 7-12 work best.
  • Step 2: Ask each group to sit in a circle, so that they can see the other people in their group.
  • Step 3: Explain their challenge is to count in steps of 5 from 0 to 50, but that there is a twist!
  • Step 4: Explain that only one child is allowed to speak at a time. If two children start to speak at the same time, then they have to start again, from 5. If a mistake is made, for example the wrong number is said, then they also have to start again.
  • Step 5: For example, one child would say 5, another 10, another 15, but if two children say a number at the same time, they need to start again.
  • How long will it take before they can get to 50, without speaking over each other?

Ready for Take Off?

Can you reach 0 and get your ‘rocket’ to take off by counting backwards from 70 in 5s?

What you need: Nothing.

How to play:

  • Step 1: Before launching the activity, arrange the children into small groups. Groups of 7 – 12 work best.
  • Step 2: Ask each group to sit in a circle, so that they can see the other children in their group.
  • Step 3: Their challenge is to count from 70 to 0 in steps of 5, when they get to 0, they all need to shout ‘Take Off’ as their ‘rocket’ has launched!
  • Step 4: Explain that only one child is allowed to speak at a time. If two children start to speak at the same time, then they have to start again, from 70. If a mistake is made, for example the wrong number is said, they also have to start again.
  • Step 5: For example, one child would say 70, another 65, another 60, but if two children say a number at the same time, they need to start again.
  • Step 6: How long will it take before they can get to ‘take off’, without
    anyone speaking over each other?

Suitable for: school.

10 Times Table Games for Year 2

Tens Meet in the Middle

Which numbers will you meet in this active game?

What you need: A medium sized area (hall or carpeted area), Tens meet in the middle resource cards (see download).

How to play:

  • Step 1: Print and cut the cards from the ‘Tens Meet in the Middle’ resource sheet and give one to each child.
  • Step 2: Children walk around the space, and when you call ‘MEET’ they find a partner.
  • Step 3: They look at the number being held by their partner, and give at least two multiplication or division facts from the ten times table that are linked to that number.
  • Step 4: When both partners have successfully provided facts for each others numbers, the partners switch cards, and go and find another partner.
  • Step 5: Repeat, for 2-5 minutes with children giving related facts and switching cards and then finding new partners.

Suitable for: school.

Race the Tens

Can you race the numbers you have been given to the other side of the room?

What you need: Space for this activity, cards from Tens meet in the middle resource (see download).

How to play:

  • Step 1: Give each pair a set of 13 cards with the multiples of 10 from 10 – 120 (plus 0) using the ‘Tens Meet in the Middle’ cards if needed.
  • Step 2: Place each pair at one side of a large space (indoor or outdoor).
  • Step 3: Call out a multiplication fact from the ten times table (e.g. 3 x 10 = ?)
  • Step 4: Each pair then has to select the answer from their cards, and race them to the other side of the room, place the card there and race back to the starting point.
  • Step 5: Then call out a different multiplication fact. As you progress through the multiplication facts, begin to ask children to give you a multiplication fact that you could give that has an answer that they are ‘left’ with. Occasionally repeat facts that they have already transferred the answer to (in which case they do not ‘run’).
  • Step 6: Continue until all multiples of 10 have been transferred to the other side of the playing area.

Suitable for: school.

Read more on developing good mental maths knowledge

Best Times Tables Games KS2

Year 3 Times Tables Games

In Year 3, children start learning their multiplication facts of the 3, 4, and 8 times tables. The 4 and 8 times tables are introduced as related to the 2 times tables (doubling each time). 5 times table and 2 times table should now be solid so it’s worth practising these too.

2 Times Tables Game for Year 3

Divided Twos!

Can you win this game of division bingo?

What you need: Mini whiteboards/pieces of paper.

How to play:

  • Step 1: On a mini whiteboard or piece of scrap paper, ask children to each write down six different ‘bingo’ numbers between 1 and 12.
  • Step 2: Call out any division question that is linked to the two times table.
  • Step 3: If children have the answer to the question on their whiteboard or
    paper, they cross it off.
  • Step 4: Try to vary the language used, for example, you may say 20 divided
    by 2 is…’ or ‘6 in groups of three is…’
  • Step 5: Once a child has crossed off all of their numbers, they should stand
    up and shout ‘DIVIDED TWOS’ before the adult checks to make sure
    that all of their numbers have been called.
  • Step 6: The child has to then explain to the group why they have been able
    to cross at least three of their numbers.

Suitable for: home, school.

3 Times Table Games for Year 3

Threes in the Middle!

What 3 times table facts will you meet in this game?

What you need: A medium sized area for the activity, Multiples of 3 cards up to 36 resource (see download).

How to play:

  • Step 1: Print and cut the cards from the ‘multiples of 3’ resource sheet and give one card to each child.
  • Step 2: Children walk around the space, and when you call ‘MEET’ they find a partner.
  • Step 3: They look at the number being held by their partner, and give at least two multiplication or division facts from the 3 times table that are linked to that number.
  • Step 4: When both partners have successfully provided facts for each other’s numbers, the partners switch cards, and go and find another partner.
  • Step 5: Repeat, for 2 to 5 minutes with children giving related facts and switching cards and then finding new partners.

Suitable for: School.

Claim the Threes!

Who can claim all the cards first?

What you need: Multiples of 3 cards up to 36 resource (see download).

How to play:

  • Step 1: Give each pair a cut up set of the cards from the ‘multiples of 3’ resource sheet. Have them deal them between each other. You can play this game at home with your child.
  • Step 2: Children take it in turns to turn over one of their cards.
  • Step 3: They then race to say a division fact, that is linked to the 3 times
    table, and place their hand on the card.
  • Step 4: The first player to give a correct division fact, that is linked to the 3 times table, wins the card. For example, if the card said 24, children could say ‘24 divided by 3 is 8’ or ‘24 divided by 8 is 3’ but not ‘24 divided by 2 is 12’.
  • Step 5: If a player incorrectly ‘claims’ the card by stating an incorrect or unlinked division fact, then the other player gains the card.
  • Step 6: Play continues until either player gains all the cards or the time you have set is up. If both players still have cards, the one with the most cards wins.

Suitable for: home, school.

4 Times Table Games for Year 3

Terrible Twenty-Eight

Watch out for the number 28 in this ‘fact passing’ game!

What you need: Mini whiteboards.

How to play:

  • Step 1: Arrange children so that they are standing in a circle, with a mini whiteboard and pen at their feet. The adult leading the game should be part of the circle. A child, chosen by the adult, starts by saying ‘0 x 4 = 0’
  • Step 2: The next child (in the direction chosen by the adult) says the next multiplication fact for the 4 times table (i.e. 1 x 4 = 4)
  • Step 3: Children continue passing the ‘count’ around the circle.
  • Step 4: If a child has to say ‘7 x 4 = 28’ then they are out, and have to sit down.
  • Step 5: The count then continues until it reaches ‘12 x 4 = 48’ and then it reverses back to 0 (i.e. the next player says ‘11 x 4 = 44’. Each time a player has to say ‘7 x 4 = 28’ they sit down.
  • Step 6: Players who are sat down have to then predict (using their reasoning skills) on their mini whiteboard who will be the next player to be ‘out’.
  • Step 7: Two children ‘win’ the game, the last child standing, and the child who has got the most ‘predictions’ correct.
  • Step 8: You can change the ‘Terrible’ multiplication fact to focus on any
    multiplication fact from the 4 times table that children are struggling to recall.

Suitable for: school.

Four Duel!

Let’s duel with the four times table!

What you need: a pack of playing cards for each pair of pupils.

How to play:

  • Step 1: Give each pair of children a pack of playing cards. Explain that in this game, an Ace is worth 1, a Jack is worth 11 and a Queen or King is worth 12. You can play this game at home with your child.
  • Step 2: Children take it in turns to turn over one of the cards. The children then race against each other to multiply the number drawn by 4, announcing their answer by placing their hand on the card (in a similar style to when playing a snap based game).
  • Step 3: If the child who is the first to put their hand on the card says the correct answer, they get to keep the card, if, however, the say the incorrect answer (and their partner spots) their partner gets the card.
  • Step 4: Keep playing until there are no cards left in the draw pile. You may prefer to set a time limit (e.g. three minutes) per round.
  • Step 5: The player with the most cards at the end of the round wins.

Suitable for: home, school.

5 times table games for year 3

Fishy Fives

Can you replace all numbers that are a multiple of five in this fishy challenge?

What you need: Nothing

How to play:

  • Step 1: Ask the children/child to start counting in steps of 1, but each time they say a multiple of 5, they need to replace the number with ‘Fish’.
  • Step 2: Start counting from 1 as a class, for example you would say 1, 2, 3, 4, fish, 6, 7, 8, 9, fish.
  • Step 3: Continue the count in this way to at least 60 (12 x 5).
  • Step 4: Discuss what children notice about the numbers they are replacing with ‘fish’.
  • Step 5: Vary the game by passing the count along a line/around a circle, so that an individual child says each number, and then the next child
    in the line/circle says the next number etc.
  • Step 6: You can also make the game competitive by asking all children to
    stand up. Begin counting, but if a child makes a mistake (e.g. they say fish when they shouldn’t, or they say add the multiple of 5 after ‘fish’, for example, 1, 2, 3, 4, fish, 5) they are ‘out’ and sit down. Which child can last the longest?

Suitable for: home, school.

8 Times Table Games for Year 3

Eight Hold Up!

Can your pair hold up the answer to the question your teacher calls out first?

What you need: Medium digit cards 0-10 resource (create yourself or see download). You can also make your own digit cards at home.

How to play:

  • Step 1: Give each pair two sets of medium 0-9 digit cards. You can use the cards provided in the resources if needed. You can play this game at home with your child.
  • Step 2: Call out questions related to multiplication or division and the 8 times table.
  • Step 3: Children race to hold up the digit card(s) that form the answer.
  • Step 4: The first five pairs who answer correctly gain a point.
  • Step 5: Ask a child from a pair who has gained a point to justify and explain
    their answer.
  • Step 6: Keep playing until one pair has gained six points.

Suitable for: home, school.

Are the 2, 4 and 8 times tables linked? Can you prove it?

What you need to play: Nothing.

How to play:

  • Step 1: Say the following statement together: ‘Evie says I think my 4 times table is linked to my 8 times table’. Invite children to discuss this in small groups.
  • Step 2: Bring the class back together and share some of the thoughts from each group. Challenge the children to create a picture or other representation to show how the 2 times tables are linked.
  • Step 3: Then ask children if they think the 8 times table is linked to any other times tables. Give children time to investigate, and discuss together. Can children identify and explain the link between the 2 and 8 times tables?

Suitable for: home, school.

Mixed Number Times Tables Games for Year 3

Find the Cheese Times Tables Board Game!

Can you use your multiplication and division skills to help get your ‘mouse’ to the cheese in this times tables board game.

What you need A copy of ‘Find the Cheese’ game board per pair of pupils, a dice per pair of pupils, a counter per pupil.

How to play:

  • Step 1: Arrange children into pairs, and give each pair a copy of the ‘find the cheese’ game board, a six-sided dice and a counter (which becomes their ’mouse’) each. You can play this game at home with your child.
  • Step 2: Explain that children need to roll the dice and move their counter the number of spaces that they rolled.
  • Step 3: They then need to answer the question on the square, or follow out the instruction. If they land on a question square, and their partner spots that they have answered the question incorrectly, they must return to the square that they came from.
  • Step 4: Who can get their ‘mouse’ to the cheese first? To finish the game, children must land on the cheese.

Suitable for: home, school.

Bingo, Bingo!

Write down six EVEN numbers between 2 and 50 in this game of Bingo.

What you need: Nothing.

How to play:

  • Step 1: Invite children/child to each write down six different even numbers between 2 and 50.
  • Step 2: Tell children these are their ‘Double Bingo’ numbers, and they can cross them off when you call out a number that, when doubled, makes one of their numbers.
  • Step 3: Call out any number between 1 and 25. Children need to mentally double the number, and if the result is a number they have written down, they cross it off. For example, if you called out 15, any child who had 30 written down would cross out 30.
  • Step 4: Invite children to consider what numbers they are ‘waiting’ for you to call.
  • Step 5: Once a child has crossed off all of their numbers, they should stand up and shout ‘BINGO BINGO’ and then explain to the group why they have been able to cross off all their numbers, for example ‘I was able to cross off 20, as 10 was called out and double 10 is 20’.

Suitable for: home, school.

Year 4 Times Tables Games

In Year 4, times tables are a major focus, not just because of the multiplication tables check in the summer of Year 4. Children are expected to have mastered their 6, 7, 9, 11 and 12 times tables, as well as those from the previous years. Links between the 11, 12 and 9 times tables and the 10 times table are encouraged.

9 times table lesson
An example of a Year multiplication lesson from Third Space Learning’s online tuition

6 Times Table Games for Year 4

Sixes Splat

Who will be the Sixes Splat Champion?

What you need: Nothing.

How to play:

  • Step 1: Stand the children in a circle with the teacher in the middle.
  • Step 2: The teacher points to a child, while calling out a 6 times table
    question (e.g. 4 lots of 6 is…, 6 times 7 is… 36 divided by 6 is…)
  • Step 3: The person who is pointed at ducks down, and the two people either side of the person who is pointed at turn to face each other, and call out the answer to the question.
  • Step 4: The first player to correctly call the answer ‘splats’ the other player,
    and the player who has been ‘splat’ is temporarily out of the game.
  • Step 5: Continue playing, rotating, pointing and calling out questions at an increasing speed.
  • Step 6: When two children are left, you have a ‘Six Splat Off’. The children stand back to back. Call out random numbers, and for each number you call out each child takes a step forward. When you call out a multiple of 6, they need to turn around, point and shout ‘splat’. The player who ‘splats’ the other player the quickest is your overall champion.
  • Step 7: Restart the game, with all children being back ‘in’ and play again.

Suitable for: school.

Sixes on Target!

Who can write down a division question involving the target number first?

What you need: Mini whiteboards.

How to play:

  • Step 1: Arrange children into groups of 4 – 6, and give each a mini whiteboard. The children in each group should have roughly the same fluency in the rapid recall of the 6 times table and related division facts. You can play this with two children at home.
  • Step 2: Write a multiple of 6 on the board. This is your first ‘target number’.
  • Step 3: Children race to write down a division question that involves both
    this ‘target number’ and the number 6 on their whiteboard. For example, if you wrote 42, children could write 42 ÷ 6 = 7 or 42 ÷ 7 = 6.
  • Step 4: The first person in each group to correctly write a division sentence wins a point.
  • Step 5: Continue by writing a new target number, and repeating the stages above. The game ends either after a set period of time, or when one player gains a set number of points.

Suitable for: home, school.

7 Times Table Games for Year 4

Savvy Sevens Choir

Can you join a counting choir?

What you need: Nothing.

How to play:

  • Step 1: Arrange children into at least three groups.
  • Step 2: Explain to each group of children that they are a ‘choir’ together
    and therefore need to respond/speak together as one group.
  • Step 3: The teacher is the ‘conductor’. When you point at each group, they say a 7 times table fact, with the first group starting with ‘1 x 7 = 7’,
    and then continuing in order to ‘12 x 7 = 84’. Groups should respond
    quickly when pointed at (conducted!)
  • Step 4: Initially, ‘point’ to each group in turn, but then begin to point to
    them in a random order, including pointing to the same group twice in a row. Gradually also increase the speed of your ‘conducting’.
  • Step 5: You should see the children begin to try and predict and have the answer ‘ready’ for the next times table they think they will be called upon to call. As children are encouraged to respond together, whispered discussions about the next response in between the times they are ‘pointed at’ are fine.

Suitable for: school.

Seven times table museum

Let’s turn your class into a museum!

How to play:

  • Step 1: Read the following sentence to your children/child, “Let’s turn your class/home into a museum! Can you create some different representations that show the 7 times table and its related division facts?”
  • Step 2: Invite the children to discuss in pairs what representation they could create. Share some of these ideas together, and ensure children understand the task. Explain any restrictions/limitations on what they can/can’t use in the classroom as needed.
  • Step 3: Give children time to create at least four different representations that involve the 7 times table and related division facts. Encourage children to use a range of representations, introducing pictorial representations.
  • Step 4: At the end of the session, invite children to ‘display’ their ‘artefacts’, and to explore each other’s ‘artefacts’. Can they identify what multiplication or division fact it represents?

What you need: Nothing.

Suitable for: home, school.

9 Times Table Games for Year 4

Nine Dice Duel

Can you get to 19 points before your partner?

What you need: six-sided dice.

How to play:

  • Step 1: Put children in pairs who have a similar level of fluency with the recall of the nine times table. Give each child a six-sided dice. You can play this at home with your child.
  • Step 2: Children both roll their dice. They then race against each other to add the numbers shown on both dice together, and multiply the answer by 9. For example, if one child rolled a 3 and the other a 5, they would need to complete 8 x 9.
  • Step 3: The first child to successfully complete the multiplication and announce it in the style of ‘_ x 9 = _’ wins a point.
  • Step 4: Which child can get to 19 points the quickest?
  • Step 5: You can also add an additional element of competition by getting
    each pair to combine their scores, and race against each other to see which pair can be the first to get to 39 points.

Suitable for: home, school.

Shark nines

Can you escape the sharks in this active game?

What you need: a large space for the activity, 12 hula-hoops, Large Digit Cards 0-12 resource (create yourself or see download).

How to play:

  • Step 1: Set out 12 hula-hoops around a large space. Each hoop needs a different number from 1-12 next to it, from the ‘0-12’ resource sheet (do not use 0).
  • Step 2: Explain to the children that they are swimmers and their aim is not to get eaten by sharks! Explain that the sharks eat anyone who is in the circle that has the answer to the question that you call out from the 9 times table.
  • Step 3: Ask the children to run around. After a while call out ‘SHARKS!’ and the children have five seconds to stand inside a hoop which isn’t already full of children.
  • Step 4: Once the time is up, call out a multiple of 9 (e.g. 72). The children work out which number is multiplied by 9 to make 72, and all the children then shout ‘8 x 9’ is 72, so the sharks eats number 8’.
  • Step 5: All the children who were in the hoop that corresponded to the number you multiplied by 9 to make the number called (so in our example, 8) are out, or, depending on how long you have to play, they lose one of their set number of lives. When children are out, they still need to join in with the whole class ‘shout’.
  • Step 6: Ask the children to move around the space again, and continue to play as above.

Suitable for: school.

11 Times Table Games for Year 4

Double Vision?

To answer any 11 times table question you simply write the number you are multiplying 11 by twice. Can you prove that this is correct?

What you need: Nothing.

How to play:

  • Step 1: Read the following statement to your children: To answer any 11 times table question you simply write the number you are multiplying 11 by twice. So if you are working out 5 x 11 you just write 5 twice, making 55. You can also play this game at home with your child.
  • Step 2: Ask the children to discuss this problem in pairs, and to decide if the statement is Always, Sometimes, or Never true.
  • Step 3: Share children’s initial thinking as a class.
  • Step 4: Establish together that the pattern in the statement is only
    sometimes true.
  • Step 5: Ask the children to spend time in their pairs working out why the pattern exists for 1 – 9 x 11, but doesn’t work for 10 – 12 x 11. Encourage them to represent the times tables in different ways, including with tens frames, number blocks and number lines, exploring the link between 10 x and 11 x.
  • Step 6: After a period of paired discussion and exploration, explore the patterns that children have noticed together as a class.

Suitable for: home, school.

Geo Eleven

How quickly can you make arrays on your geoboard

What you need: Geoboards (peg boards), elastic bands.

How to play:

  • Step 1: Give each child or pair (depending on resource available), a geoboard (sometimes called a peg board) and some elastic bands.
  • Step 2: Call out either a multiple of 11 (e.g. 77) OR a times table statement
    (without the answer e.g. 7 x 11 = ?) involving the 11 times table.
  • Step 3: Children then need to race to create an array on the geoboard using an elastic band that either represents the times table statement
    given, or the multiple of 11 (for example, if 77 was called, they
    would make a 7 x 11 or 11 x 7 array with the elastic band).
  • Step 4: Children then discuss with another child or pair, comparing their
    geoboards and checking their answers with each other, making
    sure they both agree. Repeat, giving another statement or multiple of 11.

Suitable for: school.

12 Times Tables Games for Year 4

Reach the Twelves

How quickly can you run to the number that you multiply by 12 to make the number your teacher calls out?

What you need: Large Digit Cards 0-12 resource (create yourself or see download). You can also make your own digit cards at home.

How to play:

  • Step 1: Before the lesson, print and place the large cards with 0-12 on from the ‘0-12’ resource sheet around the outside of the room.
  • Step 2: Begin by getting all children into the centre of the room.
  • Step 3: Call out a multiple of 12 (up to 144).
  • Step 4: Children have to run to the number that they multiply by 12 to
    make the number you called out, for example, if you called out 84,
    the children would run to the number 7.
  • Step 5: Once all children are at the correct number, they need to say the
    multiplication fact out loud together, for example, they would say
    ‘seven times twelve is 84’.
  • Step 6: Children then return to the centre of the room, and you call out
    another multiple of 12.
  • Step 7: Encourage children to explain their thinking and reasoning. Repeat
    as many times as you wish. To add in an element of competition, you may wish to award points for the first five children who reach the correct answer.

Suitable for: school.

All Out Skirmish!

Let’s have a skirmish with our 1-12 x table multiplication facts!

What you need: playing cards

How to play:

  • Step 1: Give each pair a pack of playing cards (jokers removed) and explain that during this game, an Ace is worth 1, a Jack is worth 11 and a Queen or King is worth 12. You can also play this game at home with your child.
  • Step 2: Ask each pair to shuffle their cards, and to deal their cards equally between them.
  • Step 3: Children count to 3, and turn the card from the top of their pack.
  • Step 4: The children then race against each other to multiply the number
    on their own and their partners card together.
  • Step 5: They announce the answer by saying the answer followed by
    ‘skirmish’ and placing their hand over the cards, in a similar style to
    snap.
  • Step 6: If the child who is the first to put their hand on the card says the
    correct answer, they get to keep the card. If, however, they say the incorrect answer (and their partner spots it) their partner gets the card.

Suitable for: home, school.

Mixed Numbers Times Tables Games for Year 4

Back to Back

Can you work out the number your partner has written down on their board.

What you need: Mini whiteboards.

How to play:

  • Step 1: Arrange children into groups of three, so that two children – each holding a whiteboard and pen – are standing back to back, whilst the other child, who is the ‘spotter’ stands a few steps away from them.
  • Step 2: The two children standing back to back each write down a number between 1 – 12 on their whiteboard.
  • Step 3: The ‘spotter’ then multiplies the two numbers together, and announces the answer to the other players.
  • Step 4: The other two children race to work out the number that the other player must have written down (for example, if the child had written 4, and the spotter had called 20, then they could work out that the other child must have written down a 5, as 4 x 5 = 20).
  • Step 5: The first player in each group who calls out the other player’s number correctly wins a point.
  • Step 6: Repeat and rotate roles within each group.

Suitable for: school.

Year 5 Times Tables Games

In Year 5 children often work on their speed and accuracy with times tables speed tests to start developing the degree of fluency required to answer 30+ questions in the SATs at the end of Year 6. As fractions and decimals are introduced, times tables start to have real relevance to other topics.

Times Tables Games Year 5

Maths, Paper, Scissors

Can you win this maths version of ‘Rock, Paper, Scissors’?

What you need: Nothing.

How to play:

  • Step 1: Explain that this is a maths version of ‘Rock, Paper, Scissors’. (It may be useful to demonstrate the game initially.) You can play this game at home with your child.
  • Step 2: Players stand and face each other. Players make two fists, and say together ‘maths, paper, scissor’ whilst moving their fists up and down (in a similar vein to when playing rock, paper, scissors). On scissors each player puts out between 1 and 10 fingers (you may need to adapt the game to 2-10 if children are over using the 1 times table!)
  • Step 3: Players then race to multiply the number of fingers they put out by the number of fingers their partner put out (e.g. 6 x 8) and call out the answer. The player to call the correct answer first, wins a point.
  • Step 4: Play then continues in this ‘battle’ for an allotted time period, for example 2 minutes. This is a fast-paced and energetic game!
  • Step 5: Once children have played the game a couple of times, begin to encourage them to reason about the possible answers based on the number of fingers they decide to put out. If desired, children can switch partners, and play again.

Suitable for: home, school.

What Do We Know Challenge!

How many facts can we find that are linked to just one multiplication statement?

What you need: Mini whiteboards, music (optional).

How to play:

  • Step 1: Begin by writing a multiplication fact in the middle of the main classroom white board from the 1 – 12 x table. For example, 6 x 7 = 42.
  • Step 2: Give children/child three minutes to write as many related facts to this fact on their mini whiteboard as they can. For example, they could write 60 x 7 = 420, 7 x 6 = 42, 6 + 6 + 6 + 6 + 6 + 6 + 6 = 42, 42,000 ÷ 7,000 = 6, 3 x 7 = 21 etc…
  • Step 3: Once children have recorded the facts on their mini whiteboards, challenge them to a race to see how many facts they can record on the classroom whiteboard in three minutes.
  • Step 4: Start a timer. Playing music is optional, but helps add excitement!
  • Step 5: Give (at least) two children a pen for the main classroom whiteboard. Ask them to race to the front and to record one related fact around the fact that they have come up with.
  • Step 6: They then need to race to give the pen to another child, who needs to race to the front and record a different fact.
  • Step 7: Continue in the same way. Stress that all children need to be given a chance to add a fact if possible and that facts cannot be repeated.
  • Step 8: At the end, count how many unique facts they have recorded as a class. Record this number somewhere, and use it as a number to beat next time

Suitable for: home, school.

Year 6 Times Tables Games

Finally by Year 6, the times tables work teachers do tends to move children beyond the core curriculum, thinking about powers of 10 (eg 30 x 40) or decimals times tables (eg 0.4 x 9)

Times Tables Games Year 6

Squares and Ladders

Can you win this maths version of ‘Snakes and Ladders’?

How to play:

  • Step 1: In this activity, children are going to use a hundred square to play a version of ‘Snakes and Ladders’. You can play this game at home with your child.
  • Step 2: First, recap with children what a square and prime number is, and how these can be identified. You may wish to identify the first few prime and square numbers with them. In this game, virtual ladders are on each square number, and snakes are on each prime number.
  • Step 3: In pairs, children place their counter to the bottom right of the hundred square (just to the side of the square with 100 in it). They take it in turns to roll a dice, and move that number of spaces, aiming to reach the ‘1’ on the top left of the square, but ‘snaking’ along, up and along each row, just like they would do in ‘Snakes and Ladders’.
  • Step 4: Once children have moved their counter, they look at the number they have landed on. If it is a square number, they get to ‘climb’ up two rows. If it is a prime number (and their partner notices) they have to ‘slither’ down one row. If they are on the bottom row and land on a prime, they move back one space. Play continues, until someone reaches 1!

What you need: A large hundred square per pair, a counter per player, six-sided dice per pair.

Suitable for: home, school.

The Equaliser

Can you beat the equaliser?

What you need: The Equaliser’s numbers list .

How to play:

  • Step 1: Show children the first list of numbers on the numbers list from the resource (0.24, 12, 0.048, 1,800). You can play this game at home with your child.
  • Step 2: With children working in pairs or small groups, challenge the
    children to work out what they need to multiply or divide each of the numbers by to make them have the same value (for the first set, children will use multiples of 2, 5 or 6 to make the values all equal).
  • Step 3: Discuss the children’s answers and solutions together, drawing out the strategies used.
  • Step 4: Then ask children to work in their pairs/groups to find solutions for the other sets of numbers.
  • Step 5: Once children have found solutions to all sets of numbers, ask them to pair up with another group, and compare their answers and strategies.
  • Step 6: Finally, challenge children to create their own version of the problem, and then ask them to swap problems with another pair/group and solve each other’s problems.

Suitable for: home, school.

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Sophie Bessemer
Sophie Bessemer
Third Space Learning
Content Team
An education publisher, content editor and primary school governor, Sophie works at Third Space producing resources and sharing best practice
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Downloadable resource

Times Tables Printable Resource Pack

Free printable versions of any resources required to complete the times tables games including the Find the cheese board game

Download Free Now!

Times Tables Printable Resource Pack

Downloadable resource

Free printable versions of any resources required to complete the times tables games including the Find the cheese board game

Download Free Now!